Heroin Treatment Portland ME

The heroin addict faces a very harsh withdrawal; the heroin addict becomes dependent on the drug very quickly. Heroin treatment involves detoxification in a medical setting where withdrawal is carefully monitored by concerned health professionals, and analgesic treatments are given to lessen the symptoms or to cope any emergencies that crop up during withdrawal.

Serenity House Inc
(207) 774-2722
30 Mellen Street
Portland, ME
Services Provided
Substance abuse , Halfway house
Types of Care
Residential long-term treatment (more than 30 days)
Special Programs/Groups
Men

Data Provided by:
Community Substance Abuse Centers
(207) 221-2292
2300 Congress Street
Portland, ME
Services Provided
Substance abuse , Detoxification, Methadone Maintenance, Methadone Detoxification
Types of Care
Outpatient
Special Programs/Groups
Pregnant/postpartum women, Women
Language Services
ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired

Data Provided by:
Northeast Occupational Exchange
(207) 553-7056
62 Elm Street
Portland, ME
Services Provided
Substance abuse , Detoxification
Types of Care
Outpatient, Partial hospitalization/day treatment
Special Programs/Groups
Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders

Data Provided by:
Portland VA Clinic
(207) 771-3500
73 Washington Avenue
Portland, ME
Services Provided
Substance abuse , Buprenorphine Services
Types of Care
Outpatient

Data Provided by:
Top of the Hill Counseling
(207) 780-8999
142 High Street
Portland, ME
Services Provided
Substance abuse
Types of Care
Outpatient
Special Programs/Groups
DUI/DWI offenders

Data Provided by:
Catholic Charities Maine
(207) 775-5671x5320
250 Anderson Street
Portland, ME
Services Provided
Substance abuse
Types of Care
Outpatient
Special Programs/Groups
Adolescents, Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders, Women, DUI/DWI offenders, Criminal justice clients
Language Services
ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired, French

Data Provided by:
YAI
(207) 874-1060
54 Maple Street
Portland, ME
Services Provided
Substance abuse , Halfway house, Buprenorphine Services
Types of Care
Residential short-term treatment (30 days or less), Residential long-term treatment (more than 30 days)
Language Services
ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired

Data Provided by:
City of Portland/Portland Public Hlth
(207) 874-8445
20 Portland Street
Portland, ME
Services Provided
Substance abuse
Types of Care
Outpatient
Language Services
ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired

Data Provided by:
Transitions Counseling Inc
(888) 773-8886
222 Saint John Street
Portland, ME
Services Provided
Substance abuse
Types of Care
Outpatient

Data Provided by:
Access Team
(207) 780-0020
576 Saint John Street
Portland, ME
Services Provided
Substance abuse , Buprenorphine Services
Types of Care
Outpatient
Special Programs/Groups
Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders, Women, Men, Criminal justice clients
Language Services
ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Heroin Treatment

It is very important to get a heroin addict into heroin treatment as quickly as possible. This is due to the speed at which the condition progresses. Also, the sooner one is treated, the more likely there is a greater success rate to kicking the addiction. Conversely, the longer it takes to get treated, the less like it is that the addict will ever recover.

The heroin addict faces a very harsh withdrawal; the heroin addict becomes dependent on the drug very quickly. Heroin treatment involves detoxification in a medical setting where withdrawal is carefully monitored by concerned health professionals, and analgesic treatments are given to lessen the symptoms or to cope any emergencies that crop up during withdrawal.

After the addict is detoxed and drug free, he or she should probably be placed in a long term heroin treatment program so that he or she can move into the next phase of treatment. (Withdrawal is just the first step.)

Methodone for Heroin Treatment

Sometimes the drug methadone is used as a panacea; it is taken orally and acts to suppress withdrawal. Most importantly, it relieves the craving for the drug. It is that craving which causes many addicts to relapse into use. There are other drugs available now which can be used instead of methadone. These other drugs block the not only the brain’s heroin receptors but also receptors of other drugs, so if there is a concurrent addiction to another drug, there is treatment available.

Therapy, counseling and di...

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