Alcohol Abuse Portland ME

Alcohol abuse may start innocently enough. Letting off steam on the weekends, sporting events where you tie on a few too many, grabbing a buddy to hit the bar scene after a break-up. No one intentionally sets out to engage in alcohol abuse or set the stage for alcoholism, but all too often that’s exactly what happens.

Community Substance Abuse Centers
(207) 221-2292
2300 Congress Street
Portland, ME
Services Provided
Substance abuse , Detoxification, Methadone Maintenance, Methadone Detoxification
Types of Care
Outpatient
Special Programs/Groups
Pregnant/postpartum women, Women
Language Services
ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired

Data Provided by:
Serenity House Inc
(207) 774-2722
30 Mellen Street
Portland, ME
Services Provided
Substance abuse , Halfway house
Types of Care
Residential long-term treatment (more than 30 days)
Special Programs/Groups
Men

Data Provided by:
City of Portland/Portland Public Hlth
(207) 874-8445
20 Portland Street
Portland, ME
Services Provided
Substance abuse
Types of Care
Outpatient
Language Services
ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired

Data Provided by:
Transitions Counseling Inc
(888) 773-8886
222 Saint John Street
Portland, ME
Services Provided
Substance abuse
Types of Care
Outpatient

Data Provided by:
Top of the Hill Counseling
(207) 780-8999
142 High Street
Portland, ME
Services Provided
Substance abuse
Types of Care
Outpatient
Special Programs/Groups
DUI/DWI offenders

Data Provided by:
Catholic Charities Maine
(207) 775-5671x5320
250 Anderson Street
Portland, ME
Services Provided
Substance abuse
Types of Care
Outpatient
Special Programs/Groups
Adolescents, Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders, Women, DUI/DWI offenders, Criminal justice clients
Language Services
ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired, French

Data Provided by:
Crossroads for Women
(207) 773-9931
66 Pearl Street
Portland, ME
Services Provided
Substance abuse , Buprenorphine Services
Types of Care
Outpatient
Special Programs/Groups
Pregnant/postpartum women, Women, DUI/DWI offenders

Data Provided by:
Portland VA Clinic
(207) 771-3500
73 Washington Avenue
Portland, ME
Services Provided
Substance abuse , Buprenorphine Services
Types of Care
Outpatient

Data Provided by:
YAI
(207) 874-1060
54 Maple Street
Portland, ME
Services Provided
Substance abuse , Halfway house, Buprenorphine Services
Types of Care
Residential short-term treatment (30 days or less), Residential long-term treatment (more than 30 days)
Language Services
ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired

Data Provided by:
Access Team
(207) 780-0020
576 Saint John Street
Portland, ME
Services Provided
Substance abuse , Buprenorphine Services
Types of Care
Outpatient
Special Programs/Groups
Persons with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders, Women, Men, Criminal justice clients
Language Services
ASL or other assistance for hearing impaired

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Alcohol Abuse

Alcohol abuse may start innocently enough. Letting off steam on the weekends, sporting events where you tie on a few too many, grabbing a buddy to hit the bar scene after a break-up. No one intentionally sets out to engage in alcohol abuse or set the stage for alcoholism, but all too often that’s exactly what happens.

There’s a lot of misconceptions swirling around about the notion of alcohol abuse and alcoholism. While alcohol abuse is often a precursor to alcoholism, this is not always the case. Someone can abuse alcohol and not be an alcoholic. The difference lies in the genetic make-up of each individual. People predisposed to alcoholism have a genetic predisposition that results in processing alcohol differently than others. This makes it difficult for them to stop drinking once they start. This phenomenon is known as craving. Craving for alcohol occurs on a mental and physical level, and can be so intense in alcoholics that everything else goes out the window. Work, school, relationships, responsibilities - all have been known to fall by the wayside in order to satisfy the craving for alcohol.

This is a considerable difference from someone who may begin drinking heavily after the loss of a loved one. Major life trauma or transitions can lead an individual to abuse alcohol in order to cope with grief and stress. While this is not the healthiest behavior, neither does it mean someone is an alcoholic. The best indicator is life management. If someone drin...

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